jspark3000:

Hello there, Twitter-verse.

blakebaggott:

I’m gonna take a second to appreciate this twitter convo between jspark3000 and musiqchild007 that had me DYING

jspark3000:

Someone broke into my car last night and made a mess of everything inside, and they left my doors and trunk open. They stole absolutely nothing. Maybe they got scared after seeing my Scofield Study Bible and my pamphlets from the Salvation Army and the giant poster with a dove flying over a halo Jesus.

linguisten:

walkingphrase:

"Guess we covered most languages in Europe."
(Actually, languages like Gaelic, Maltese, Sorbian, or Bulgarian are missing. But close enough.)
The reason why “sugar” looks so similar throughout many European languages is borrowing from the same source:

[…]from Medieval Latin succarum, from Arabic sukkar, from Persian shakar, from Sanskrit sharkara “ground or candied sugar,” originally “grit, gravel” (cognate with Greek kroke “pebble”). The Arabic word also was borrowed in Italian (zucchero), Spanish (azucar, with the Arabic article), and German (Old High German zucura, German Zucker), and its forms are represented in most European languages (such as Serbian cukar, Polish cukier, Russian sakhar).  Its Old World home was India (Alexander the Great’s companions marveled at the “honey without bees”) and it remained exotic in Europe until the Arabs began to cultivate it in Sicily and Spain; not until after the Crusades did it begin to rival honey as the West’s sweetener.
source

To think that I just went to a 1 Euro shop to look at cheap stuff for the kitchen. Guess I can’t escape being a linguist.

Sweet. (*scnr*). But “most languages in Europe”? Come on… that’s 16 out of 72 (285)?

linguisten:

walkingphrase:

"Guess we covered most languages in Europe."

(Actually, languages like Gaelic, Maltese, Sorbian, or Bulgarian are missing. But close enough.)

The reason why “sugar” looks so similar throughout many European languages is borrowing from the same source:

[…]from Medieval Latin succarum, from Arabic sukkar, from Persian shakar, from Sanskrit sharkara “ground or candied sugar,” originally “grit, gravel” (cognate with Greek kroke “pebble”). The Arabic word also was borrowed in Italian (zucchero), Spanish (azucar, with the Arabic article), and German (Old High German zucura, German Zucker), and its forms are represented in most European languages (such as Serbian cukar, Polish cukier, Russian sakhar).

Its Old World home was India (Alexander the Great’s companions marveled at the “honey without bees”) and it remained exotic in Europe until the Arabs began to cultivate it in Sicily and Spain; not until after the Crusades did it begin to rival honey as the West’s sweetener.

source

To think that I just went to a 1 Euro shop to look at cheap stuff for the kitchen. Guess I can’t escape being a linguist.

Sweet. (*scnr*). But “most languages in Europe”? Come on… that’s 16 out of 72 (285)?

Valley Forge Christian College Steps up to University Status

godmoves:

Today is the day!

Valley Forge Christian College is now the University of Valley Forge!

The glorious grace of God does not simply erase, it creates.

Rob Kaple (via godmoves)

(Source: bread-and-wine)